Library News

New Books in the Library

New Books Fall 2018


Fiction


Hooper by Geoff Herbach

From Geoff Herbach, the critically acclaimed author of the Stupid Fast series, comes a compelling new YA novel about basketball, prejudice, privilege, and family, perfect for fans of Jordan Sonnenblick, Andrew Smith, and Matt de la Peña.

For Adam Reed, basketball is a passport. Adam’s basketball skills have taken him from an orphanage in Poland to a loving adoptive mother in Minnesota. When he’s tapped to play on a select AAU team along with some of the best players in the state, it just confirms that basketball is his ticket to the good life: to new friendships, to the girl of his dreams, to a better future.

But life is more complicated off the court. When an incident with the police threatens to break apart the bonds Adam’s finally formed after a lifetime of struggle, he must make an impossible choice between his new family and the sport that’s given him everything.


Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D. Schmidt

The two-time Newbery Honor winner Gary D. Schmidt delivers the shattering story of Joseph, a father at thirteen, who has never seen his daughter, Jupiter. After spending time in a juvenile facility, he’s placed with a foster family on a farm in rural Maine. Here Joseph, damaged and withdrawn, meets twelve-year-old Jack, who narrates the account of the troubled, passionate teen who wants to find his baby at any cost. In this riveting novel, two boys discover the true meaning of family and the sacrifices it requires.


The Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds

Just when seventeen-year-old Matt thinks he can’t handle one more piece of terrible news, he meets a girl who’s dealt with a lot more—and who just might be able to clue him in on how to rise up when life keeps knocking him down—in this “vivid, satisfying, and ultimately upbeat tale of grief, redemption, and grace” (Kirkus Reviews) from the Coretta Scott King – John Steptoe Award–winning author of When I Was the Greatest.

Matt wears a black suit every day. No, not because his mom died—although she did, and it sucks. But he wears the suit for his gig at the local funeral home, which pays way better than the Cluck Bucket, and he needs the income since his dad can’t handle the bills (or anything, really) on his own. So while Dad’s snagging bottles of whiskey, Matt’s snagging fifteen bucks an hour. Not bad. But everything else? Not good. Then Matt meets Lovey. Crazy name, and she’s been through more crazy stuff than he can imagine. Yet Lovey never cries. She’s tough. Really tough. Tough in the way Matt wishes he could be. Which is maybe why he’s drawn to her, and definitely why he can’t seem to shake her. Because there’s nothing more hopeful than finding a person who understands your loneliness—and who can maybe even help take it away.


Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

An ode to Put the Damn Guns Down, this is National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestseller Jason Reynolds’s fiercely stunning novel that takes place in sixty potent seconds—the time it takes a kid to decide whether or not he’s going to murder the guy who killed his brother.

A cannon. A strap.

A piece. A biscuit.

A burner. A heater.

A chopper. A gat.

A hammer

A tool

for RULE

Or, you can call it a gun. That’s what fifteen-year-old Will has shoved in the back waistband of his jeans. See, his brother Shawn was just murdered. And Will knows the rules. No crying. No snitching. Revenge. That’s where Will’s now heading, with that gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, the gun that was his brother’s gun. He gets on the elevator, seventh floor, stoked. He knows who he’s after. Or does he? As the elevator stops on the sixth floor, on comes Buck. Buck, Will finds out, is who gave Shawn the gun before Will took the gun. Buck tells Will to check that the gun is even loaded. And that’s when Will sees that one bullet is missing. And the only one who could have fired Shawn’s gun was Shawn. Huh. Will didn’t know that Shawn had ever actually USED his gun. Bigger huh. BUCK IS DEAD. But Buck’s in the elevator? Just as Will’s trying to think this through, the door to the next floor opens. A teenage girl gets on, waves away the smoke from Dead Buck’s cigarette. Will doesn’t know her, but she knew him. Knew. When they were eight. And stray bullets had cut through the playground, and Will had tried to cover her, but she was hit anyway, and so what she wants to know, on that fifth floor elevator stop, is, what if Will, Will with the gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, MISSES.

And so it goes, the whole long way down, as the elevator stops on each floor, and at each stop someone connected to his brother gets on to give Will a piece to a bigger story than the one he thinks he knows. A story that might never know an END…if WILL gets off that elevator.


Bear Town by Fredrik Backman

The bestselling author of A Man Called Ove returns with a dazzling, profound novel about a small town with a big dream—and the price required to make it come true.

People say Beartown is finished. A tiny community nestled deep in the forest, it is slowly losing ground to the ever-encroaching trees. But down by the lake stands an old ice rink, built generations ago by the working men who founded this town. And in that ice rink is the reason people in Beartown believe tomorrow will be better than today. Their junior ice hockey team is about to compete in the national semi-finals, and they actually have a shot at winning. All the hopes and dreams of this place now rest on the shoulders of a handful of teenage boys.

Being responsible for the hopes of an entire town is a heavy burden, and the semi-final match is the catalyst for a violent act that will leave a young girl traumatized and a town in turmoil. Accusations are made and, like ripples on a pond, they travel through all of Beartown, leaving no resident unaffected.

Beartown explores the hopes that bring a small community together, the secrets that tear it apart, and the courage it takes for an individual to go against the grain. In this story of a small forest town, Fredrik Backman has found the entire world.


The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

Alaska, 1974.

Unpredictable. Unforgiving. Untamed.

For a family in crisis, the ultimate test of survival.

Ernt Allbright, a former POW, comes home from the Vietnam war a changed and volatile man. When he loses yet another job, he makes an impulsive decision: he will move his family north, to Alaska, where they will live off the grid in America’s last true frontier.

Thirteen-year-old Leni, a girl coming of age in a tumultuous time, caught in the riptide of her parents’ passionate, stormy relationship, dares to hope that a new land will lead to a better future for her family. She is desperate for a place to belong. Her mother, Cora, will do anything and go anywhere for the man she loves, even if means following him into the unknown.

At first, Alaska seems to be the answer to their prayers. In a wild, remote corner of the state, they find a fiercely independent community of strong men and even stronger women. The long, sunlit days and the generosity of the locals make up for the Allbrights’ lack of preparation and dwindling resources.

But as winter approaches and darkness descends on Alaska, Ernt’s fragile mental state deteriorates and the family begins to fracture. Soon the perils outside pale in comparison to threats from within. In their small cabin, covered in snow, blanketed in eighteen hours of night, Leni and her mother learn the terrible truth: they are on their own. In the wild, there is no one to save them but themselves.

In this unforgettable portrait of human frailty and resilience, Kristin Hannah reveals the indomitable character of the modern American pioneer and the spirit of a vanishing Alaska―a place of incomparable beauty and danger. The Great Alone is a daring, beautiful, stay-up-all-night story about love and loss, the fight for survival, and the wildness that lives in both man and nature.


Music of the Ghosts by Vaddey Ratner

This “novel of extraordinary humanity” (Madeleine Thien, author of Do Not Say We Have Nothing) from New York Times bestselling author Vaddey Ratner reveals “the endless ways that families can be forged and broken hearts held” (Chicago Tribune) as a young woman begins an odyssey to discover the truth about her missing father.

Leaving the safety of America, Teera returns to Cambodia for the first time since her harrowing escape as a child refugee. She carries a letter from a man who mysteriously signs himself as “the Old Musician” and claims to have known her father in the Khmer Rouge prison where he disappeared twenty-five years ago.

In Phnom Penh, Teera finds a society still in turmoil, where perpetrators and survivors of unfathomable violence live side by side, striving to mend their still beloved country. She meets a young doctor who begins to open her heart, confronts her long-buried memories, and prepares to learn her father’s fate.

Meanwhile, the Old Musician, who earns his modest keep playing ceremonial music at a temple, awaits Teera’s visit. He will have to confess the bonds he shared with her parents, the passion with which they all embraced the Khmer Rouge’s illusory promise of a democratic society, and the truth about her father’s end.

A love story for things lost and restored, a lyrical hymn to the power of forgiveness, Music of the Ghosts is a “sensitive portrait of the inheritance of survival” (USA TODAY) and a journey through the embattled geography of the heart where love can be reborn.


The President is Missing by Bill Clinton & James Patterson

The President Is Missing confronts a threat so huge that it jeopardizes not just Pennsylvania Avenue and Wall Street, but all of America. Uncertainty and fear grip the nation. There are whispers of cyberterror and espionage and a traitor in the Cabinet. Even the President himself becomes a suspect, and then he disappears from public view . . .

Set over the course of three days, The President Is Missing sheds a stunning light upon the inner workings and vulnerabilities of our nation. Filled with information that only a former Commander-in-Chief could know, this is the most authentic, terrifying novel to come along in many years.


Graphic Novels


Illegal by Eoin Colfer & Andrew Donkin,

A powerfully moving graphic novel by New York Times bestselling author Eoin Colfer and the team behind the Artemis Fowl graphic novels that explores the current plight of undocumented immigrants.

Ebo is alone.His brother, Kwame, has disappeared, and Ebo knows it can only be to attempt the hazardous journey to Europe, and a better life―the same journey their sister set out on months ago.

But Ebo refuses to be left behind in Ghana. He sets out after Kwame and joins him on the quest to reach Europe. Ebo's epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his family.


The Time Machine Adapted by Davis & Ruiz

A scientist invents a machine that carries him into the future. While there, he discovers a race of gentle humans. He also meets some evil creatures. Even worse, his Time Machine is trapped deep inside their secret caverns. These reader-favorite tiles are now updated for enhanced Common Core State Standards support, including discussion and writing prompts developed by a Common Core expert, an expanded introduction, bolded glossary words and dynamic new covers.


Moby Dick Adapted by Lance Stahlberg

It was an obsession that would destroy them all...

On a cold December night, a young man called Ishmael rents a room at an inn in Massachusetts. He has come from Manhattan to the north-east of America to sign up for a whaling expedition.

Later that same night, as Ishmael is sleeping, a heavily tattooed man wielding a blade enters his room. This chance meeting is just the start of what will become the greatest adventure of his life.

The next day, Ishmael joins the crew of a ship known as the Pequod. He is approached by a man dressed in rags who warns him that, if he sails under the command of Captain Ahab, he may never come back. Undaunted, Ishmael returns early the next morning and leaves for the high seas.

For the crew of the Pequod, their voyage is one of monetary gain. For Captain Ahab, however, it is a mission driven by hatred, revenge, and his growing obsession with the greatest creature of the sea.


Macbeth: The Graphic Novel Adapted by John McDonald

Witches, murder, ghosts, and madness — one of Shakespeare’s finest tragedies is also a perfect fit for the graphic novel format. This compelling adaptation depicts every blood-curdling scene in easy-to-follow illustrations, accompanied by Shakespeare’s original text. An illustrated cast of characters reminds readers who’s who, and fascinating background information on Shakespeare and the real Macbeth adds historical context.


Romeo & Juliet: The Graphic Novel Adapted by Gareth Hinds

She’s a Capulet. He’s a Montague. But when Romeo and Juliet first meet, they don’t know they’re from rival families — and when they find out, they don’t care. Their love is honest and raw and all consuming.But it’s also dangerous. How much will they have to sacrifice before they can be together?In a masterful adaptation faithful to Shakespeare’s original text, Gareth Hinds transports readers to the sun-washed streets and market squares of Shakespeare’s Verona, vividly bringing the classic play to life on the printed page.


World War Two: Against the Rising Sun by Jason Quinn

Campfire's World War II: Against The Rising Sun focuses on the war in the East, through the eyes of the servicemen and civilians on both sides of the conflict. From the invasion of Manchuria by Japan in 1937, right through to the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we witness the end of the British Empire, the rise and fall of Japan and destruction the likes of which the world must never know again.

While authoritative texts on World War Two often tend to focus disproportionately on the European theater of war, the Pacific theater was no less dramatic, with its roots stretching back to the early 1930s. This book tells the history of World War Two in the Pacific theater, told from many perspectives.


Sherlock: A Study in Pink by Steven Moffat & Mark Gatiss Jay

Holmes and Watson tackle brain-teasing crimes in modern-day London in this stunning Manga, presented in its original right-to-left reading order, and in the full chapters as originally serialized! Meet Holmes and Watson for the first time... all over again!


Fetch: How a Bad Dog Brought Me Home by Nicole J. Georges

When Nicole Georges was sixteen she adopted Beija, a dysfunctional shar-pei/corgi mix—a troublesome combination of tiny and attack, just like teenaged Nicole herself. For the next fifteen years, Beija would be the one constant in her life. Through depression, relationships gone awry, and an unmoored young adulthood played out against the backdrop of the Portland punk scene, Beija was there, wearing her “Don’t Pet Me” bandana.

Georges’s gorgeous graphic novel Fetch chronicles their symbiotic, codependent relationship and probes what it means to care for and be responsible to another living thing—a living thing that occasionally lunges at toddlers. Nicole turns to vets, dog whisperers, and even a pet psychic for help, but it is the moments of accommodation, adaption, and compassion that sustain them. Nicole never successfully taught Beija “sit,” but in the end, Beija taught Nicole how to stay.

***

Non-Fiction

Nevertheless We Persisted: 48 Voices of Defiance Strength, and Courage Foreword by Senator Amy Klobuchar

A powerful collection of essays from actors, activists, athletes, politicians, musicians, writers, and teens, including Senator Amy Klobuchar, actress Alia Shawkat, actor Maulik Pancholy, poet Azure Antoinette, teen activist Gavin Grimm, and many, many more, each writing about a time in their youth when they were held back because of their race, gender, or sexual identity--but persisted.


It Occurs To Me That I Am America Introduction by Viet Thanh Nguyen

In time for the one-year anniversary of the Trump Inauguration and the Women’s March, this provocative, unprecedented anthology features original short stories from thirty bestselling and award-winning authors—including Alice Walker, Richard Russo, Walter Mosley, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Hoffman, Neil Gaiman, Michael Cunningham, Mary Higgins Clark, and Lee Child—with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize–winning author Viet Thanh Nguyen.

When Donald Trump claimed victory last November, the US literary world erupted in indignation. Many of America’s leading writers and artists openly resist the current administration’s dogma and earliest policy moves, and they’re not about to go gently into that good night. In It Occurs to Me That I Am America: New Stories and Art, more than thirty of the most acclaimed modern writers consider the fundamental ideals of a free, just, and compassionate democracy—through fiction.

Featuring artwork by some of today’s best known artists, cartoonists, and graphic novelists—including Art Spiegelman, Roz Chast, Marilyn Minter, and Eric Fischl—who cover political, social, and cultural issues, this anthology is a beautiful, enduring collection that will resonate with anyone concerned with the contest for our American soul.


Pain Killer: An Empire of Deceit and the Origin of America’s Opioid Epidemic by Barry Meier

Between 1999 and 2017, an estimated 250,000 Americans died from overdoses involving prescription painkillers, a plague ignited by Purdue Pharma’s aggressive marketing of OxyContin. Families, working class and wealthy, have been torn apart, businesses destroyed, and public officials pushed to the brink.

In this updated edition of Pain Killer, Barry Meier breaks new ground in his decades-long investigation into the opioid epidemic. He takes readers inside Purdue to show how long the company withheld information about the abuse of OxyContin and gives a shocking account of the Justice Department’s failure to alter the trajectory of the opioid epidemic and protect thousands of lives. Equal parts crime thriller, medical detective story, and business exposé, Pain Killer is a hard-hitting look at how a supposed wonder drug became the gateway drug to a national tragedy.


The Operator: Firing the Shots that Killed Osama Bin Laden by Robert O’Neill

This instant New York Times bestseller—“a jaw-dropping, fast-paced account” (New York Post) recounts SEAL Team Operator Robert O’Neill’s incredible four-hundred-mission career, including the attempts to rescue “Lone Survivor” Marcus Luttrell and abducted-by-Somali-pirates Captain Richard Phillips, and which culminated in the death of the world’s most wanted terrorist—Osama bin Laden.

In The Operator, Robert O’Neill describes his idyllic childhood in Butte, Montana; his impulsive decision to join the SEALs; the arduous evaluation and training process; and the even tougher gauntlet he had to run to join the SEALs’ most elite unit. After officially becoming a SEAL, O’Neill would spend more than a decade in the most intense counterterror effort in US history. For extended periods, not a night passed without him and his small team recording multiple enemy kills—and though he was lucky enough to survive, several of the SEALs he’d trained with and fought beside never made it home.


Innovation Lab Resources

20 Makey Makey Projects for the Evil Genius by Colleen & Aaron Graves

20 fun and inventive Makey Makey projects for Makers from beginner to expert

This hands-on guide is filled with DIY projects that show readers, step-by-step, how to start creating and making cool inventions with the Makey Makey invention kit. Each project features easy-to-follow, fully-illustrated instructions and detailed photographs of the finished gadget. Readers will see how to apply these skills and start building their own Makey Makey projects.


Our Magazine Collection

Oxford’s Magazine List

October 2018


Time October 22, 2018

Featured Articles:

  • Beyond the Base - Why President Trump’s supporters ignore the noise and stick with him.
  • Trumpism After Trump - The emerging conservative thinkers reshaping the right.
  • Next Generation Leaders - Young trailblazers who are reshaping the world, from an Argentine women’s-rights activist and a Saudi storyteller to a global K-pop phenomenon.


Time October 15, 2018

Featured Articles:

  • What America Heard - Lasting lessons from testimony of Christine Blasey Ford.
  • 50 Genius Companies - From space travel to indoor cycling, businesses that are shaping the future.
  • Self-Defense - Doctors are activating the immune system for new ways to treat breast cancer.


Time October 8, 2018

Featured Articles:

  • Supreme Stakes - The consequences of the low road to the highest court.
  • In Search of Equality - As the U.S. grapples with the gender gap, Sweden’s efforts to close it offer lessons.
  • Sunshine State Showdown - GOP Senate hopeful woos Latinos in the fight for control of Congress.
  • A New Star is Born - Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga give fresh life to an old song.


Time October 1, 2018

Featured Articles:

  • A Modern Morality Play - How much of the Brett Kavanaugh drama have we seen before?
  • After the Storms - North Carolina residents cope with the damage wrecked by Hurricane Florence.
  • The Oligarch Connection - How Putin’s network of billionaires worked the 2016 campaign.


The Atlantic October 2018

Featured Articles:

  • A Warning from Europe - Polarization. Conspiracy theories. Attacks on the free press. An obsession with loyalty. Recent events in the U.S. follow a pattern Europeans know all too well.
  • Why Technology Favors Tyranny - Artificial intelligence could erase many practical advantages of democracy, and erode the ideals of liberty and equality. It will further concentrate power among a small elite if we don’t take steps to stop it.
  • Losing the Democratic Habit - Americans once learned self-governance by practicing it constantly - in lodge halls, neighborhood associations, and labor unions. As participation in these institutions has dwindled, so has public faith in democracy.
  • The Threat of Tribalism - The Constitution once united a diverse country under a banner of ideas. But partisanship has turned Americans against one another - and against the principles enshrined in our founding document.
  • A House Still Divided - America is divided by racism - and the threat is as existential as it was before the Civil War.
  • Madison vs the Mob - The Founders designed a government that would be insulated from the heat of popular sentiment, but they didn’t anticipate the unbridled passions of the digital age.
  • A Civic Reawakening? - A photo essay on democracy in practice in our current moment.
  • America’s Courts Can’t Ignore the World - The U.S. Constitution is an American document. And American law should look exclusively to American precedents, right? Not so, a Supreme Court justice says.
  • Building an Autocracy - Will American democracy survive Trump? And will the midterms matter?
  • Will Beth Moore Lose her Flock? - The Texas evangelical built an empire by teaching scripture to women - and being deferential to men. Now she’s risking it all to speak out against sexism.
  • Up All Night - Some animals are going nocturnal to avoid their main enemy - us.


Harper’s October 2018

Featured Articles:

  • The Printed World in Peril - The age of Homo virtual is upon us.
  • Checkpoint Nation - Border agents are expanding their reach into the country’s interior.
  • Paper Terrorism - Anti-government vigilantes wield a subtle weapon.
  • Nothing But Gifts - Finding a home in a world gone awry.
  • Exile - And a year of trying to find a road back from personal and public shame.


Discover September 2018

Featured Articles:

  • Tech Explosion - Scientists can’t explode nukes in the real world, so they’ve gotten creative - and helped spark a tech revolution in the process.
  • Hearing Nemo - It turns out fish are quite the chatterboxes. Scientists have begun eavesdropping on the conversations happening beneath the waves.
  • The Vanishing City - Burning Man’s temporary desert community has attracted the interest of two scientists. Their work is broadening a novel field of archaeology.
  • Chance Encounters - Random numbers are the foundation of online security, protecting everything from urban infrastructure to airline ticket sales. But the numbers are running out, and creating more is harder than it sounds.
  • Mind Over Matter - People who seek meaning in life tend to find it … everywhere.
  • Origin Story - Is it time to tear up the old lexicon and redefine what a species is?


Make October/November

Projects:

  • Dog Bowl Coffee Roaster - Achieve a perfectly even roast automatically with a built-in spinner, stirrer, and heat gun.
  • Eye of Newt - Add a digital eyeball to a creepy charm you can wear for Halloween - or all year.
  • Easy Ultrasonic Levitation - Hack cheap distance sensors to make tiny objects float in mid-air.
  • Hot Mods - Cut, shape, and customize Hot Wheels cars to suit your style - and win prizes!
  • 1+2+3 Follow Me Eyes - Make these simple eyes that seem to follow you wherever you stand.
  • Racing Robots - Inspired by board game RoboRally, navigate a zany obstacle course with actual bots.
  • Write on Time - Assemble a cute robot arm to draw the current time in luminescent numerals.
  • Amateur Scientists: DIY Sunburn Sensors - Build, hack, and deploy detectors to measure solar UV radiation.
  • Flashy Fashion - Light up the room with these lightweight LED earrings.
  • 1+2+3 Inner Tube Earrings - Upcycled bike tubes into elegant adornments.
  • Electronics Fun & Fundamentals: Audible Aqua - Use an op-amp to build a water purity tester you can hear.
  • Documenting DNA - Capture your bio-experiments with a Raspberry Pi gel imager.


Wired October 2018

Featured Articles:

  • Fight the Dour - The revolution is just getting started. And there’s more reason than ever to embrace militant optimism.
  • The Great Upwelling - As the world became connected regular people acquired superpowers. Call it the rise of the bottom.
  • The Tipping Point - We predicted a digital revolution with all the fervor of true believers. Then the revolution conquered all.
  • The Age of Awareness - Status update: We are all now sci-fi telepaths, deafened by the blaring thoughts of humanity.
  • Long Live the Web - Things break and decay on the internet, as in all human endeavors. And then they are replaced.


National Geographic October 2018

Featured Articles:

  • Threatened by the Outside World - Tribes in the Amazon.
  • Scary, Squishy, Brainless, Beautiful - What makes jellyfish so fascinating?
  • Iran’s Nomads Fading Away - Hardship brings change to a way of life.
  • Rulers of the Sky - Humans and falcons have been partners for millennia.
  • I am an American - Scenes from the Japaneses internment still resonate today.
  • American Tapestry - Census data reveal two and a half centuries of migration, conflict and prosperity.
  • Flowers in a New Light - A technique that relies on ultraviolet light reveals the hidden, colorful - and even sparky - attributes of common plants.
  • Despite Perils, Decide to Hope - Conflict, climate change, and pollution plague us.
  • Prance Discovery - The dance moves of an unusual-looking bird in New Guinea came as a surprise to scientists.
  • ‘Sometimes It’s Like Chasing Ghosts’ - To help us understand imperiled ocean creatures, Brian Skerry takes photos - for as long as his lungs allow.
  • Rhino Recovery - Fewer than 100 Sumatran rhinos remain. A new conservation effort aims to save the.


Smithsonian October 2018

Featured Articles:

  • Zooming in on Petra - Using drones equipped with 3-D cameras, a team of digital archaeologists is working to create a precise virtual model of the spectacular, once-bustling ancient stone city in Jordan.
  • Flight of the Hunter - With its ghostlike plumage and yellow eyes, the snowy owl is one of the Far North’s most captivating creatures. Now scientists say it’s disappearing - and they’re not sure why.
  • The End of the Line - A hundred years after the last guns fell silent, our writer travels along the storied Western Front to face the hard truths and hazy memories of the “War to End All Wars.”
  • Flying Colors - The self-described “ink evangelist” whose fanciful, hand-drawn coloring books for adults launched a worldwide craze is back with a brand-new volume of playful botanical illustrations just waiting to be brought to life.


Art News Fall 2018

Featured Articles:

  • The ArtNews Top 200 Collectors - Our annual list of the world’s top collectors.
  • Big-Hearted - In Los Angeles, Jane and Marc Nathanson’s starry nights.
  • Wool Gathering - The Hill Art Foundation will open next year on New York’s High Line park.
  • Maximum Minimalism - Emily and Mitchell Rales’s expanded Glenstone Museum will rank among the most ambitious private art museums in the world.
  • Grace and Will - Indefatigable painter Grace Hartigan flouted ‘50s norms for women.
  • Let’s Hang - With space-sharing programs, galleries are banding together to battle an uncertain market.
  • Mission Accomplished? - As mainstream art museums rush to diversify, what is the role of culturally specific museums working for a cause?
  • Can Connoisseurship Survive in the Digital Age? - A collector reflects on a time before the data stream flooded over.


Teaching Tolerance Fall 2018

Featured Articles:

  • The Book of Matthew - Twenty years after his death, Matt Shepard’s story matters more than ever.
  • LGBTQ Best Practices Guide - Use this excerpt from our new guide to tune up your school and classroom policies and help LGBTQ students thrive.
  • Imagining a World Without White Supremacy - These TT Educator Grant projects invited students to challenge the structures of white supremacy and connect their classrooms to their communities.
  • A Museum. A Memorial. A Message. - The Equal Justice Initiative new attractions confront visitors with the truth about racial terror - and offer a path toward healing.
  • Segregation by Design - Richard Rothstein talks about this book The Color of Law and the unsettling history of housing segregation.
  • What is White Privilege, Really? - Think you know what white privilege is? Take a closer look with our new resource.
  • The School-to-Deportation Pipeline - For undocumented students, zero-tolerance discipline policies can lead to outcomes much worse than suspension.
  • This is Not a Drill - Your guide to resisting enhanced immigration enforcement.
  • Closing the Diversity Gap - New research sheds light on how to recruit - and retain - teachers of color.
  • Rebounding from Hate - When her team faced racist harassment, this middle school girls’ basketball coach helped her players “rise up.”
  • And the Winners Are… - Meet the recipients of the 2018 Teaching Tolerance Award for Excellence in Teaching.


Independent School Fall 2018

Featured Articles:

  • We Need to Talk - The case for making a place for race in schools.
  • Another Dimension - Building and supporting socioeconomic diversity.
  • Raising Their Voices - Student perspectives on navigating race and class elite spaces.
  • A Just Lens - Using a social justice framework to guide diversity, equity, and inclusion work.
  • Work in Progress - Perspectives from LGBTQ faculty and staff.
  • Hire Learning - Helping schools find - and keep- faculty and staff who reflect their missions and goals.
  • Shining a Light - Developing a bias-aware admission process.
  • Chasing Inclusion - A look at the creation and work of the nascent Inclusion Dashboard Consortium.






Book Trailers

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What's Mrs. Gilman reading?

Fall 2018

Little Fire Everywhere By Celeste Ng

From the bestselling author of Everything I Never Told You, a riveting novel that traces the intertwined fates of the picture-perfect Richardson family and the enigmatic mother and daughter who upend their lives.

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town--and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia's past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs.

Little Fires Everywhere explores the weight of secrets, the nature of art and identity, and the ferocious pull of motherhood – and the danger of believing that following the rules can avert disaster.

Spring 2018


Before We Were Yours Lisa Wingate

Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family's Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge--until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children's Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents--but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility's cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger and uncertainty.

Aiken, South Carolina, present day. Born into wealth and privilege, Avery Stafford seems to have it all: a successful career as a federal prosecutor, a handsome fiancé, and a lavish wedding on the horizon. But when Avery returns home to help her father weather a health crisis, a chance encounter leaves her with uncomfortable questions and compels her to take a journey through her family's long-hidden history, on a path that will ultimately lead either to devastation or to redemption.

Based on one of America's most notorious real-life scandals--in which Georgia Tann, director of a Memphis-based adoption organization, kidnapped and sold poor children to wealthy families all over the country--Lisa Wingate's riveting, wrenching, and ultimately uplifting tale reminds us how, even though the paths we take can lead to many places, the heart never forgets where we belong.


February 2018

And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini


Khaled Hosseini, the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, has written a new novel about how we love, how we take care of one another, and how the choices we make resonate through generations. In this tale revolving around not just parents and children but brothers and sisters, cousins and caretakers, Hosseini explores the many ways in which families nurture, wound, betray, honor, and sacrifice for one another; and how often we are surprised by the actions of those closest to us, at the times that matter most. Following its characters and the ramifications of their lives and choices and loves around the globe—from Kabul to Paris to San Francisco to the Greek island of Tinos—the story expands gradually outward, becoming more emotionally complex and powerful with each turning page.

October/November 2017

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells

The Glass Castle is a remarkable memoir of resilience and redemption, and a revelatory look into a family at once deeply dysfunctional and uniquely vibrant. When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly. But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive. Her mother was a free spirit who abhorred the idea of domesticity and didn’t want the responsibility of raising a family.

The Walls children learned to take care of themselves. They fed, clothed, and protected one another, and eventually found their way to New York. Their parents followed them, choosing to be homeless even as their children prospered.


The Glass Castle is truly astonishing—a memoir permeated by the intense love of a peculiar but loyal family.

September 2017

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline

Christina Baker Kline’s Orphan Train is an unforgettable story of friendship and second chances that highlights a little-known but historically significant movement in America’s past—and it includes a special PS section for book clubs featuring insights, interviews, and more.

Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to “aging out” out of the foster care system. A community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvie and worse...

As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life—answers that will ultimately free them both.

Rich in detail and epic in scope, Orphan Train is a powerful novel of upheaval and resilience, of unexpected friendship, and of the secrets we carry that keep us from finding out who we are.

May 2017

I am currently reading Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

Sisters. Strangers. Survivors.

More than twenty years ago, Claire and Lydia’s teenaged sister Julia vanished without a trace. The two women have not spoken since, and now their lives could not be more different. Claire is the glamorous trophy wife of an Atlanta millionaire. Lydia, a single mother, dates an ex-con and struggles to make ends meet. But neither has recovered from the horror and heartbreak of their shared loss—a devastating wound that's cruelly ripped open when Claire's husband is killed.

The disappearance of a teenage girl and the murder of a middle-aged man, almost a quarter-century apart: what could connect them? Forming a wary truce, the surviving sisters look to the past to find the truth, unearthing the secrets that destroyed their family all those years ago . . . and uncovering the possibility of redemption, and revenge, where they least expect it.

April 2017

I am currently reading The Shack By William P. Young


Mackenzie Allen Philips' youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his Great Sadness, Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend. Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack's world forever.

March 2017

I am currently reading The Zookeepers Wife by Diane Ackerman

A true story in which the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands.

After their zoo was bombed, Polish zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski managed to save over three hundred people from the Nazis by hiding refugees in the empty animal cages. With animal names for these "guests," and human names for the animals, it's no wonder that the zoo's code name became "The House Under a Crazy Star." Best-selling naturalist and acclaimed storyteller Diane Ackerman combines extensive research and an exuberant writing style to re-create this fascinating, true-life story―sharing Antonina's life as "the zookeeper's wife," while examining the disturbing obsessions at the core of Nazism.

February 2017

I am currently reading Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse at a Connecticut hospital with more than twenty years’ experience. During her shift, Ruth begins a routine checkup on a newborn, only to be told a few minutes later that she’s been reassigned to another patient. The parents are white supremacists and don’t want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The hospital complies with their request, but the next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery. Does she obey orders or does she intervene?

Ruth hesitates before performing CPR and, as a result, is charged with a serious crime. Kennedy McQuarrie, a white public defender, takes her case but gives unexpected advice: Kennedy insists that mentioning race in the courtroom is not a winning strategy. Conflicted by Kennedy’s counsel, Ruth tries to keep life as normal as possible for her family—especially her teenage son—as the case becomes a media sensation. As the trial moves forward, Ruth and Kennedy must gain each other’s trust, and come to see that what they’ve been taught their whole lives about others—and themselves—might be wrong.


January 2017

I am currently reading When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

December 2016

I am currently reading Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal

What separates your mind from an animal’s? Maybe you think it’s your ability to design tools, your sense of self, or your grasp of past and future―all traits that have helped us define ourselves as the planet’s preeminent species. But in recent decades, these claims have eroded, or even been disproven outright, by a revolution in the study of animal cognition. Take the way octopuses use coconut shells as tools; elephants that classify humans by age, gender, and language; or Ayumu, the young male chimpanzee at Kyoto University whose flash memory puts that of humans to shame. Based on research involving crows, dolphins, parrots, sheep, wasps, bats, whales, and of course chimpanzees and bonobos, Frans de Waal explores both the scope and the depth of animal intelligence. He offers a firsthand account of how science has stood traditional behaviorism on its head by revealing how smart animals really are, and how we’ve underestimated their abilities for too long.

November 2016

I am currently reading Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Playing on every teen’s passionate desire to look as good as everybody else, Scott Westerfeld (Midnighters) projects a future world in which a compulsory operation at sixteen wipes out physical differences and makes everyone pretty by conforming to an ideal standard of beauty. The "New Pretties" are then free to play and party, while the younger "Uglies" look on enviously and spend the time before their own transformations in plotting mischievous tricks against their elders. Tally Youngblood is one of the most daring of the Uglies, and her imaginative tricks have gotten her in trouble with the menacing department of Special Circumstances. She has yearned to be pretty, but since her best friend Shay ran away to the rumored rebel settlement of recalcitrant Uglies called The Smoke, Tally has been troubled. The authorities give her an impossible choice: either she follows Shay’s cryptic directions to The Smoke with the purpose of betraying the rebels, or she will never be allowed to become pretty. Hoping to rescue Shay, Tally sets off on the dangerous journey as a spy. But after finally reaching The Smoke she has a change of heart when her new lover David reveals to her the sinister secret behind becoming pretty. The fast-moving story is enlivened by many action sequences in the style of videogames, using intriguing inventions like hoverboards that use the rider’s skateboard skills to skim through the air, and bungee jackets that make wild downward plunges survivable -- and fun. Behind all the commotion is the disturbing vision of our own society -- the Rusties -- visible only in rusting ruins after a virus destroyed all petroleum. Teens will be entranced, and the cliffhanger ending will leave them gasping for the sequel. (Ages 12 and up) --Patty Campbell --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


October 2016

I am currently reading Relativity by Antonia Hayes

“Twelve-year-old Ethan Forsythe, an exceptionally talented boy obsessed with physics and astronomy, has been raised alone by his mother in Sydney, Australia. Claire, a former professional ballerina, has been a wonderful parent to Ethan, but he’s becoming increasingly curious about his father’s absence in his life. Claire is fiercely protective of her talented, vulnerable son—and of her own feelings. But when Ethan falls ill, tied to a tragic event that occurred during his infancy, her tightly-held world is split open.

Thousands of miles away on the western coast of Australia, Mark is trying to forget about the events that tore his family apart, but an unexpected call forces him to confront his past and return home. When Ethan secretly intercepts a letter from Mark to Claire, he unleashes long-suppressed forces that—like gravity—pull the three together again, testing the limits of love and forgiveness.”

September 2016

I am currently reading All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

"Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge."